collage saying carry on laughing joy

Riding uncertainty to find the spark of joy

Marie Kondo’s method of decluttering has been around for a few years and is currently experiencing increased popularity fuelled by the Netflix series. If you have read her book, “The life-changing magic of tidying” or are an avid Netflix watcher you will probably know that the question of what sparks joy sits at the heart of her philosophy. I happily admit that by following joy and her magic folding method my T-Shirt drawers are still in good shape more than three years on! For me, the question, ‘Does it spark joy?’, emphasises the fleeting nature of joy. It suggests that joy needs to be sparked repeatedly. Joy can be a wonderful emotion as long as we accept that it will vanish quickly. Like happiness, the pursuit of joy can become a burden if we start to chase it as a continuous state.When we expand the search for joy beyond teapots and sock drawers and apply it to careers, homes, relationships things get trickier. We all accept that these areas of life require some hard work but if the spark of joy becomes permanently absent, many of us wonder what needs to change in order to invite more moments of joy back into our lives.

While the journey towards joy is courageous it is not always a joyful one. It will almost always throw us into the chaos of uncertainty. Research has shown that we are hardwired to dislike uncertainty.

Even to a degree that we prefer the certainty of a negative outcome over uncertainty! Uncertainty increases our stress levels and when we are embarking on change, we accept travelling on the road of fear and self-doubt. We receive frequent and unsolicited reminders from our inner critic that we are taking too big a risk, going into the wrong direction and are probably not up to the job of transforming anyway. We doubt whether things will ever turn out the way we hope, dream, imagine, whether they will ever spark joy.

Art therapy offers some rich ways to explore our inner critic and, on the flipside, get more acquainted with our inner teacher, wise sage or compassionate mentor. It is a way of exploring our relationship with uncertainty, especially as it doesn’t depend on a verbal expression of our experience. Expressing this turbulent journey creatively allows us to give form to it without knowing what exactly is going on, let alone why. We don’t need to have the words for how we feel in this liminal space of change. And as we progress in our exploration, we will find a way to give voice to the mucky terrain of change and uncertainty and find ways how we can best traverse it, always with the possibility and intention to rediscover joy.


Find out more about my work at Sensemaking Space

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *