Tag Archives: creative process

Letters spelling creativity on colourful background

Creativity – a superpower of the future?

The world is changing… it has always been changing. Most recently though, we might have felt this change more intensely. The reality of living in a VUCA world has moved from board rooms into living rooms. VUCA stands for a world that is volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous – and don’t we know what that feels like?! This world asks for creative resilient responses. It’s no surprise that creativity has been listed among the top work skills for the future.

The World Economic Forum’s Future of Jobs Report predicts creativity, innovation and ideation will be key skills. A 2010 IBM study among CEOs revealed creativity as the single most important leadership skill. The McKinsey Global Institute identified increasing demand for higher cognitive skills including creativity.

What exactly is creativity?

Too often people’s thoughts jump to art classes and canvases. They hasten to add that they don’t have a creative bone in their body. And many of us have been made to believe that creativity is for the creative types or the truly gifted – an exclusive club which we don’t belong to.

I offer you an alternative definition, quoting Sir Ken Robinson: creativity is “the process of having original ideas that have value.”

“I think of creativity as putting your imagination to work. It’s like the executive wing of imagination. You can be imaginative all day long and never do anything. To be creative, you have to do something.”

Sir Ken Robinson

Creative childhoods

Most of us have memories of being creative as a child. There might be anecdotes or even videos of your contribution to dance, music or drama performances. The drawing that hung on the fridge for ages, or maybe even something that got framed?? And then there are all the games and roleplays we invented; the fancy dress outfits we wore.

George Land’s longitudinal creativity study showed that 98% of 5-year-olds fell into the category of ‘creative genius’. This percentage dropped rapidly as these kids grew up, and among a representative sample of adults, 2% believed to be creative. Land concluded that “non-creative behaviour is learned”. Therefore, we need to nurture our inherent creativity and un-learn the non-creative beliefs and behaviours.

Creativity for survival

We can find more evidence that we are creative creatures beyond statistical research:  our dexterity with an opposable thumb suggests we evolved to make things. This ability and our creativity ensured our survival. As Liz Gilbert wrote:

“If you’re alive, you’re a creative person. You and I and everyone you know are descended from tens of thousands of years of makers. Decorators, tinkerers, storytellers, dancers, explorers, fiddlers, drummers, builders, growers, problem-solvers, and embellishers–these are our common ancestors.”

―Elizabeth Gilbert

Benefits of creativity

Creativity has several benefits which are very useful in the VUCA world and the workplace of the future:

  • When we engage in a creative act, we focus on the present moment and calm our busy minds. this is increasingly important in the context of information overload and a world full of distractions.
  • In the early stages of the creative process, we think divergently. We think broadly and delay filtering and selecting of ideas. In a world of speed and productivity this doesn’t always come easy.
  • We experience accomplishment and learn to trust the process and our abilities – cultivating a growth mindset instead of a fixed one.
  • We strengthen our imagination and problem-solving skills.
  • We explore and express our inner world – being grounded in our inner selves helps us navigate an ever-changing external world.
  • We build resilience for tough times.

Nurturing creativity becomes a cornerstone in caring for our wellbeing, in our private lives as well as in the workplace where the above-mentioned benefits can lead to more successful innovation, increased productivity and focus, better crisis management, overall resilience, improved collaboration and empathic leadership.

How to re-start your creativity

The main success factor in rediscovering creativity is time. Not tons of it, just the commitment to choose creativity and find pockets of time to practice it with intention. Ringfence a time of day, go on an artist date with yourself, establish a weekend practice.

Even though art therapy shows that our most significant insights are often achieved when working with a modality we are less comfortable or familiar with, I recommend starting from a place of preference or familiarity when you befriend your creativity again. Think back to creative activities and forms of play you enjoyed as a child. Whether it’s improv theatre or water colour painting. If you feel drawn to a particular material like textiles, wood or clay you might want to begin there.

It also helps to start with something that fits more easily in your everyday life. For many of us, a sketchbook is more practical than easel and canvas. Exploring photography through a daily photo using your smartphone can be more achievable than attempting your SLR camera manual.

Are you drawn to practical things or do you like to do things ‘just for fun’? If you are the practical type, making your own tea mugs or baking might suit you more than knitting miniature fruits and vegetables. And vice versa.

The accountability, encouragement and shared joy of creating in a group can also assist. Find a class, workshop, or an online course. One of my biggest joys of 2020 was the emergence of a small writing circle with women around the world using Zoom. Remember that many creative adventures do not need to begin with competence or learning a skill. We can simply get together and write or make a collage. If, at some point, we want to get better at it, we’ll be already motivated to put in extra effort. If we make ‘being good at it’ the first step, we’ll likely never start.

If you have a competitive streak, participating in a challenge can kickstart your creative endeavours. I personally love the 100-day project, but there are plenty more. You might want to use sharing your creations publicly, for example on social media or in private groups, as an accountability mechanism.

From hobby to life skill

As Tom and David Kelley write in their book Creative Confidence: “everybody is the creative type.” With the right encouragement and practice creativity can easily be rekindled, “but the real value of creativity doesn’t emerge until you are brave enough to act on those ideas.”

When we practice our creativity in this safe and joyful way, as a hobby initially and to re-charge our batteries, we will strengthen our ability to come up with creative solutions under pressure or when there’s more at stake. We will learn to trust our creativity as a work skill and weave it into our problem-solving and decision-making, steering us away from the dreaded ‘we’ve always done it like that’ principle. Most of us have been in a meeting where this was muttered, if not proclaimed aloud by some creativity grinch.

Creative coaching is a process that can kickstart the re-discovery of your creativity.

And while you are at it, you might learn a few new things about yourself, your values, beliefs, patterns or simply find the courage to begin a creative practice that could do with a cheer squad.


Find out more about my work at Sensemaking Space

a book shelf

Dear Diary

The need to ponder and reflect is a basic human need and a valuable mechanism of evolution. It supports us in learning from an experience which ensured survival. In today’s complex world, we continue to benefit hugely from learning through reflection, but often we don’t have (or don’t make?) time for a deeper reflective practice that goes beyond thinking or talking about our day.

But the desire is there! ‘Reflective journaling’ returns over 1.2 million Google search results. Amazon sells over 1000 books with ‘reflective journal’ in their title. It’s clearly something people want to find out about. Reflective journaling might be the most prevalent approach to reflection, and this post focuses on writing. But reflection can of course be achieved through other means than writing, for example through a visual art journal or sketchbook.

Reflection provides the opportunity to process and integrate experiences and let them inform our future actions. This learning can be two-fold:

  1. learning about the world and others
  2. learning about ourselves

Learning about the world is particularly important in a world that’s changing constantly, quickly and in deep and significant ways. When we reflect on new situations and unfamiliar encounters (and our way of responding to them), we understand what has worked and what hasn’t led to a beneficial outcome. By putting ourselves in others’ shoes we develop empathy and compassion for those around us.

Learning about ourselves occurs when we make our typical patterns and responses visible through reflection. This includes emotional responses which we may not want to share with others. We can therefore attend to our emotional world as the journal offers a container to hold all kinds of experiences and feelings. Reflecting on emotional patterns builds self-regulation skills, resilience and emotional intelligence. When we use a reflective practice in the workplace, it helps us identify areas for learning and development. It can therefore inform the sometimes dreaded appraisal conversation and turn this into a shared reflection – not all reflection has to be a solitary activity. Reflection can be used as a tool for self-motivation and encouragement as it makes our progress visible, no matter how small the steps. Teresa Amabile has done extensive research on the importance of identifying and acknowledging progress in the workplace.

For learning to happen we must find a way of effectively capturing the key insights. There is always a risk of losing them in the constant busyness of our minds or in a sea of written notes. That why I find a written reflective practice so valuable. I have written about my process to find what works for me before. It is based on Julia Cameron’s Morning Pages, but I now call my practice ‘Anytime Pages’, acknowledging the original approach of Julia Cameron, just with the twist that I’m writing them whenever it works for me. I figured going a little rogue on the original concept is better than not getting into a habit of daily writing at all.

But doesn’t all this writing just create more stuff? More words? More cognitive load? It’s true, even three pages a day create a lot of words, and I felt the need to reduce my writing to memorable key insights. Some people promote the idea to trust that whatever is meaningful will automatically stick. But as a recovering ‘high achiever’, I needed to process my pages in some way. In order to build a habit around my writing it had to feel useful and purposeful beyond the act of writing.

I achieve this simplification with one of my favourite art therapy processes: key words. Whenever something resonates with me, surprises me or somehow feels important, I underline it. Every now and then I write all my underlined words or phrases onto a sheet of paper. Sometimes I do this after a couple of weeks, sometimes when I have filled a journal (which takes me roughly two months). Collecting these key words helps me to record my insights in a reduced manner.

They become something I can USE:

Unexpected – my underlining is guided by my curiosity. I often underline what feels new or surprising, sometimes even dissonant, that makes my key words relevant and worth following up on as part of learning about myself.

Simple – just some key phrases – for example: from my last journal (they are just under 200 pages) I have collected five themes. This makes is manageable.

Emotional – key words resonate with me on a deeper level which in itself means they touch something inside me. Our brains have developed in a way to remember emotionally charged situations or content better than just factual stuff.

As with every creative process – it only needs to make sense to you. If you want to have a stab at developing a reflective practice here is my suggested approach to start with – remember to adjust it to whatever works for you: 

  • Get a cheap journal, nothing fancy.
  • Use stream of consciousness writing, simply let the words flow without censoring or editing, ignore spelling and grammar.
  • Consider writing with pencil, it allows you to write fast, which is often important for stream of consciousness writing, and with little pressure (good for a daily habit, avoids any repetitive strain injuries…)
  • I don’t recommend typing, writing longhand seems to help me get into the flow of writing, it feels more personal and intimate, there are fewer distractions to manage. There is a form of body memory when I’ve written something by hand rather than typed it, which again supports the end goal of learning from my reflections.
  • As suggested by Julia Cameron, I write three A4 pages each day. It helps turning it into a habit and is achievable on a daily basis.
  • If you can’t get started, tune into your mind and write whatever internal chatter you hear, It might be thoughts like: I don’t know what to write, I’m bored, what a waste of time…Write that down, it’s a start.
  • I underline as I write. With some practice you will notice the little jolt in your body when something you just wrote is important, resonates and should be captured as key words.
  • Review all your key words regularly. You decide what ‘regular’ is for you. It can be every two weeks or when you have filled a journal. Whatever feels right. But set aside some time to sit with these words.
  • Don’t get disheartened by a few days without major insights and little or no underlining. The good stuff will bubble up eventually. Sometimes it’s like doing some stretches before you start a workout. Give yourself time to warm up.

Sometimes I create a little ‘poetic reduction’ or a tagline from my key words (hello, marketing background!). This is a way to reduce things further. But that approach is another post altogether.

Go get a journal and start writing, you’ll be surprised how much wisdom you carry inside you!

If you have any questions around this topic, email me, I’m happy to share my experience. 


Find out more about my work at Sensemaking Space

trailhead of a path into the forest

Finding the trailhead of your creative process

I am on day 22 of #the100day project and my #100daysofsensemakingemotions. Once I had decided to embark on this project, I quickly devised a plan. I was going to use Tiffany Watt Smith’s ‘The Book of Human Emotions’ and create a collage a day in a journal. This is fairly typical for me and my creative process. Incubation is the first phase of any creative process, it is a phase of staying open, a phase of collecting divergent ideas and inspiration. It is often skipped in today’s fast paced world – I’m not alone in my tendency to quickly jump into doing as this is the only way to feel productive and that ‘I’ve got this’. However, incubation requires time and space, it often happens in the background when we work on something else. That’s your classic shower moment.

Initially, I described my project on Instagram with the following words: ‘to create an A-Z of emotions, using imagery, colours and words to capture 100 emotions in the form of a small book.’ So, there you go. Looking back, I notice how restricted this first project outline was. I imposed on myself the format of a book, a small one, and the order from A to Z. Luckily, I couldn’t find the right journal of around 100 pages. This bottleneck in the journal market forced me to re-enter my incubation stage. My initial idea, the second stage in the creative process, became: ‘100 days of collaging a range of emotions, possibly adding some mixed media, the rest is going to unfold as I go along.’ I kept my subject of emotions, my main art form collage, and that’s pretty much it. The initial idea is like a trailhead, a starting point. As a lover of mountains & hiking, I love this analogy from Lisa Mitchell, the author of ‘Creativity as Co-Therapist’. Arriving at the trailhead always feels energising, we’re ready, we check the time, our gear, we have an idea where this hike is taking us, roughly how long we’ll be walking, how difficult the terrain might be. And we’re ready to set off with a feeling of excitement and curiosity and without seeing the entire walk in front of us.

Whenever we try to create something or come to a decision, we must articulate an initial idea that takes into consideration our meandering thoughts from the incubating stage and remains open to changes and adjustment. Without this we become stuck, blocked and can’t get started. We might procrastinate and avoid the risk of beginning by doing more research or planning or by aborting the topic altogether. To get going we need to trust the trailhead and accept that there is always a risk that the trail might suddenly end, be poorly marked, or is treacherous…

So, how is it going with the #100daysofsensemakingemotions? It’s going well and I am so very happy that I didn’t set an A-Z order, preselect 100 emotions and didn’t find a suitable journal! The more improvised approach allows me to work with whatever emotion turns up on the day. Once I started the project, I also stopped limiting myself to just the one book and I enjoy exploring various online sources for inspiration. Without a journal I can be led by the size of the main image. And there are loads of ideas of what I might do with the 100 cards at the end. It’s still early days, but I think this more haphazard approach helps me to stick with it. This is not a manifesto to stop planning and show up in life unprepared. Bring the right gear for your hike. Take a map and a compass. But be prepared to leave the trail if it’s flooded, embrace the option to turn back if it gets too difficult or the weather changes. Without getting yourself to the trailhead you’ll never hike anywhere.

P.S. It never seizes to amaze me how we find trailheads in an art therapy session. They come in the form of an image, a colour, a twisted paper clip or a gesture. Anything goes and we are off!

Contact me to find your trailhead.

Find out more about my work at Sensemaking Space

collage cards showing a range of emotions like happiness, worry, curiosity

100 days of sensemaking emotions

I wholeheartedly recommend starting a regular creative practice – it doesn’t matter whether you consider yourself to be artistic. Such a practice can play so many roles in our lives, including (but not limited to) self-care, learning/practicing skills, fun and play, personal growth, reflection, grounding. It can be as easy as jotting down three observations about your day every evening or cooking a new recipe every week. Every year, #the100dayproject kicks off on 2nd April, and this year I wanted to jump on board to explore the effect of doing the same small creative activity every day, so I chose to create 100 small collages illustrating emotions.

We experience emotions every single moment. They inform our perceptions, choices, actions. They ripple through our bodies. Naturally dealing with emotions shows up in a lot of my work and inspired me to play with three aspects in my #100daysofsensemakingemotions:

I want to capture the different messages emotions have for us. It’s easy to feel like a paper boat in the storm when emotions throw you around. It can feel chaotic, out of control, being in the grip of emotions. But each emotion has a very specific message for us, it starts in the emotional part of our brain and sends signals to our body to get us ready for the appropriate action. Fear for example prepares our body to fight or flight, it’s an important survival response. To fight or flight, we need our bodies to send energy to the right organs and areas in the body, and to suppress less important body processes while we deal with the threat.

I wanted to shine a light on the more obscure emotions, the ones we often haven’t got words for. For many people talking about emotional experiences isn’t something that had a place in their families. We have to keep building our emotional vocabulary because it feels so good to find a way of describing and expressing them more accurately. I find these expressions intriguing, so I started my project with an obscure emotion: Altschmerz, the weariness with the same old issues you’ve always had, the same boring flaws and anxieties. Such a familiar feeling!!

I’m setting out to create a full spectrum that doesn’t label emotions as positive or negative. I’m not a fan of that classification. All emotions are useful, they turn up to tell us something. Some might give us a pleasant feeling, others can feel difficult, or icky, or challenging. Altschmerz, for example, sounds painful and uncomfortable, but if it shows up it tells us about this thing we are again and still dealing with. It makes us consider whether it is time to accept what is, or to let go of what was. The label ‘negative’ suggests these emotions are something to avoid or reject. But: we need to be able to connect with all emotions, sit with the discomfort and let them inspire action. You might have experienced that the more we’re trying to avoid or deny an emotion the more it takes over. As human beings we are unable to selectively invite certain emotions into our lives and shut others out. If for example we try to shut out shame or anger, because they feel uncomfortable or weren’t welcome in our family, we will end up cutting off joy as well, and optimism, happiness, love, excitement. Brené Brown, renowned shame researcher captures this well: 

“When we numb the dark, we also numb the light.”

Brené Brown

I hope my #100daysofsensemakingemotions creates a useful resource for my work as Art Therapist. Art Therapy provides a place to safely explore all emotions and sit with the difficulty and vulnerability they can create. All our emotions are worthy of our attention!

You can find out more about #the100dayproject here.

Find out more about my work at Sensemaking Space